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By Martin Moon

by Martin Moon

“How does conflict make you feel when working internationally?” is a good question to ask yourself. Then, how do you react to conflict? Do you tend to avoid it, address it on the spot, do you welcome it while wondering how this feels for the other?

Conflict often takes a big toll on business. This week, the news about how the Seattle business community reacted to the City Council’s new head tax traveled quickly around the world. There were probably articles about many other similar incidents, too. And how about the ones in your very own office, with your colleagues, board members, business partners, vendors, clients…

Additionally, doing business internationally takes the probability and complexity of conflict to a different level. Cultural, structural and geographic differences can add many new dimensions to conflict.

We were thrilled that Howard G. Beasey, the President and CEO of the American Turkish Council (ATC) was able to contribute to the Culture Curious Global Minds blog this week.

It is great to be able to elaborate on the importance of diplomacy skills when wanting to succeed in international business based on Mr. Beasey’s extensive experience in the U.S. – Turkey commercial relationship. There are surely many differences between the U.S. and Turkish markets. Yet the bilateral history is full of mutual journeys and business partnerships. We hope that this interview is a resource to those who work and want to work in this commercial space:

How do you see conflicts turn into opportunities in your efforts facilitating trade and investment between the United States and Turkey?

HB: When it comes to trade and investment it is important to remember that for a healthy bilateral relationship the trade must flow both ways.  The duality of prosperous trade relations creates a great deal of room for compromise and fertile ground for win/win opportunities if one is willing to look for them. 

What skills have you found most helpful when addressing conflicts? 

HB: The willingness and mental agility to accept the fact that business norms and cultures can and will differ and that these differences should not be viewed as good or bad but simply as the reality.  The sooner a person can come to this mindset the faster they will then be able to react and navigate the path for a successful outcome.  Too often we get caught up in the difference itself and cannot move past this to find a way forward. 

What life experiences do you find were/are critical to fulfilling the diplomacy and relationship building requirements in your job today? 

HB: I have had a number of interesting experiences in my career that have helped me to be more or less successful in building and maintaining professional cross-cultural relations.  For starters I have always espoused a “yes” mentality. In other words, one must start with the notion that yes is the answer and let’s figure out how to make this happen.  We have all met the individual who starts with “no” and then must be convinced that something can be done, who already starts from a deficit.  Additionally, I think that the experience of working in a multi-language environment over the years is helpful.  When you are working in these types of environments with or without interpreters you tend to use simple, concise, and direct language when communicating and secondly you will take time to listen and ensure you are understanding the subject or discussion before responding.  This professional patience and careful listening pays big dividends in this setting or frankly, any meaningful relationship.  

If interested in learning more about the nuances of doing business between the United States and Turkey consider signing up for “Work with a Global Mindset on the U.S. – Turkey Commercial Highway” to learn applicable leadership, management and communications models and engage in a Q & A session.

Unlocking the Global Mindset Energy Well: How often do you celebrate accomplishments? Celebrating the 12th Issue of StrategicStraits Weekly today – published in twelve consecutive weeks! Please use link if you would like this Newsletter conveniently delivered to your inbox every week.

 

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2017 Conference PanelDid you sign up for our upcoming event “Working with a Global Mindset on the U.S. – Turkey Commercial Highway”?

he Turkish Statistical Institute announced a 7.4% growth rate earlier this year. Oya Narin, the Head of Turkish Tourism Investors Association said in an interview that 2018 will be a time for transition and rise for Turkey. Turkish investors and business people continue exploring U.S. markets via personal trips, trade missions and the SelectUSA Conferences. At the same time, economic analysts express concerns about key financial indicators of Turkey.

The value of a global mindset is amplified in our interconnected world especially when stakes are high. The “reciprocal understanding” through the global mindset enables us to build relationships, communicate effectively, give feedback, negotiate and solve conflicts to achieve desirable results across cultural, administrative, geographic and economic divides.

Experience exchange and being well informed are critical when working in new markets. Members of the American Turkish Council (ATC) can register at ATC member rate. The participation of business people with and without experience in this bilateral relationship will enrich the content and functionality of this webinar.  We hope for a diverse attendance.

 

Did you know? Some Facts about Business in Turkey

There are over a thousand U.S. businesses doing business in Turkey. Large American companies like GE, Pfizer, Merck, P & G, Unilever, Coca Cola, Pepsi, IBM, Hilton, Ford have had headquarters in Turkey for many years with GE since the 1940s. More recent additions are Microsoft, Amgen and Amazon. Many of these firms have their regional operations in Turkey.

Turkish Airlines flies to the highest number of international destinations in the world. The airline has ranked as the best European airline for consecutive years and its philosophy is “Globally Yours”.

Turkish people are proud of (emotionally connected to) their brands. They’ve trusted the now internationally growing brands like Ülker (food), Arçelik (appliances), Mavi Jeans (textiles and fashion), Doğan Construction (construction) and Turkish Airlines (airlines) for decades.

Forty percent of small and mid-size businesses are involved in trade in Turkey. Many of these are dynamic family businesses with much experience in European and Asian markets looking to grow through bilateral and international collaborations. Turkey has also moved up on the Bloomberg Innovation Index. The geographic distance that gets perceived strongly and mentioned much more often than cultural differences by traditional small and mid-size businesses doesn’t appear to be a challenge to the innovation community of Turkey.

People address each other with Mr. And Ms. titles for a long time into the relationship or until a mutual agreement is made for first name basis. We will discuss this topic during the webinar.

 

Did you know? Some Facts about Business in the United States:

There are 50 states with their own rules and regulations. Many federal rules and regulations impact a foreign market entry such as the FDA regulations for incoming biotech firms. Additionally, there are many state and local rules and regulations that impact business incorporations, taxes, employment and other business areas.

Much meaning is packaged into words. You may receive a note saying “we have a 60-day cancelation policy” will remind trusted friends, colleagues and legal advisers in the United States. While understanding rules, regulations and contractual relationships raises the importance of working with good legal counsel this cultural nuance also results in helpful public content on websites and social media.

Business world and brands trusted. The business entity is expected to be a trusted institution. Brand reputation thrives through the brand promise, strategic communications and trustful customer relationships. Business leaders recognize the importance of corporate social responsibility towards the communities and the larger society.

Less than 10% of American small and mid-size businesses are engaged in international trade. Also, often times, a large portion of the trade in a company can be with only one country.

About a quarter of Fortune Global 500 are headquartered in the U.S. In addition to having businesses that were started in previous centuries on the list, the American business world is quick to send 21st Century model businesses like Airbnb, Uber and Tesla into the global business space.

 

Collaboration can help learn from each other and thrive internationally and globally

Being able to leverage cultural differences can result in innovation, productivity and effective global storytelling. We will compare the GlobeSmart® profiles of the United States and Turkey during the webinar. This will allow us to discuss some of the cultural nuances of the two countries. Diverse teams thrive when their leaders are educated in leading across diversity and global trends, and when team members are aware of differences and similarities.

Being able to leverage differences in business experience and geographic location can also enhance the empathy levels, relationship building capacity and global reach of diverse teams.

 

We recommend researching the nuances and history of this high potential bilateral relationship, and look forward to great conversations on June 6, 2018.

 

Unlocking the Global Mindset Energy Well: IKIGAI: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life, a book authored by Héctor García and Francesc Miralles is being discussed in the international business community, too. “Eat until you’re 80% full” is one of the recommendations.

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The ATC partners with StrategicStraits, Inc. to help the organization revise its organizational identify, unique value proposition, membership benefits, business model, content strategy and organizational learning mechanisms.

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